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Using the "descriptor" function 

Spaz
Spaz
Posts: 2


9/28/2015
Spaz
Spaz
Posts: 2
I have started using the software, after finding it most navigable and bug free, I am needed to know how to add a "descriptor" more efficiently to a set of photos, not just one photo-at-a-time. I started by pre-selecting a set of photos (lets say five or more). I then clicked on my newly created "Form", which I had pre-populated with my text in the "Image Id" field.

Now, I was expecting that my "Selected" photos would now have the "Image Id" field populated with the text that I had assigned.

But the interface only populated ONE (1) photo with my assignment text. (Not each and EVERY selected photo was given text at this point).

What is the procedure for adding a "descriptor" to multiple photos WITHOUT having to click, then populate one photo at a time ?
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Andy Schmidt
Andy Schmidt
Administrator
Posts: 113


9/28/2015
Andy Schmidt
Andy Schmidt
Administrator
Posts: 113
Spaz wrote:
What is the procedure for adding a "descriptor" to multiple photos WITHOUT having to click, then populate one photo at a time ?

Hi,
When multiple images are selected then the descriptors do show the values of the FIRST selected image. A button to the left of a descriptor changes color to indicate if some of other selected images are a different value.

Consequently, when you enter a new value, it is only replacing the content for the FIRST selected image. However, you can press on that afore-mentioned button (the "Copy All" function) to apply the value from the first image to all other selected images:

This extra steps reduces the risk of accidental overwriting existing values in (what might be) a large number of selected images.
edited by Andy Schmidt on 9/28/2015

Attachments:
copy descriptor.jpg
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Spaz
Spaz
Posts: 2


9/29/2015
Spaz
Spaz
Posts: 2
Thanks for the tip Andy, I'm finding out this, and many more useful features of this product.
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Ed
Ed
Posts: 3


8/23/2022
Ed
Ed
Posts: 3
Studioline Photo Basic 4 ver 4.2.69, Windows 10. I've been scanning Dad's WW2 pictures with intent of creating a book. When I click edit-describe, almost all the descriptors (exif) are grayed out. If I enter camera model in windows-properties-detail, it shows in the describe tab but I am unable to propagate it to the other photos as the descriptor name is still grayed out.I am able to put the photographer name into the Artist descriptor block and propagate to all photos in the folder. Do I need an activation code for the free version or do I need an upgrade? Is there a setting I missed? I am evaluating several softwares for a match to my needs and so far I like what I see here.

Attachments:
describe.jpg
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Jürgen Wolz
Jürgen Wolz
Moderator
Posts: 32


8/24/2022
Jürgen Wolz
Jürgen Wolz
Moderator
Posts: 32
Hi,
The grayed fields in the StudioLine Exif descriptor block are for display only, not for editing. The protected fields are imported from the Exif block in images from a digital camera and displayed in the corresponding StudioLine fields. Fields such as Manufacturer, Model, Serial Number, ISO ... are stored by the digital camera when the photo is taken and are not intended to be changed by the user.

Best Regards
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Ed
Ed
Posts: 3


8/24/2022
Ed
Ed
Posts: 3
I see. So no help for 80 year old view camera shots. Is it possible to make new descriptors and propagate them by folder. After scanning the negatives for my own use, they are being donated to museums and the state historical society. I think there are about 3000 shots.
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Andy Schmidt
Andy Schmidt
Administrator
Posts: 113


8/24/2022
Andy Schmidt
Andy Schmidt
Administrator
Posts: 113
Ed wrote:
no help for 80 year old view camera shots.


Not quite. The key is to understand the intended purpose of EXIF vs IPTC descriptors. To simplify, EXIF descriptors are specific to the "technical" digital file - while IPTC are specific of the content/context of a picture.

So, yes, the "date" information of the file, is "fingerprinted" by the hardware that produces the file. Of course, with digital camera hardware, the date and location information of the "file" is usually identical to what's shown on the picture. Unless a user forgot to (re)set their camera's clock, the user travelled to a different time zone, forgot to set daylight saving time, the camera's GPS chip is failing to pick up a signal, etc.
Consequently, for scanned images, it is correct that the Exif date information permanently documents the "creation" date of the digital file - no matter how old the original picture might have been. This way, if a progressively fading photograph is scanned repeatedly over the years with better hardware, etc. the EXIF date will document which one is the "most recently", or the "originally" scanned picture.
It's also correct that most EXIF information is supposed to not be permanent and not open to be "falsified" after the fact, because the information is truly authentic with respect to the technical file.

(Again, I'm simplifying, because EXIF descriptors were expanded so that a hypothetical user could theoretically add titles, categories, copyright, etc. - which is seldomly done while a photographer is clicking away hundreds of times hoping not to miss "the" shot.)

What YOU are trying to do for the museum, is instead describe the content/context of the picture. That's what the IPTC descriptors are specifically for. They are intended for the "post processing" phase of a photo shoot, where photographer sits in front of his computer, sorts through the hundreds of photos taken during an event (or a researcher goes through all the scans), correctly orients each picture, straightens them to the horizon, picks out the "keepers",... and then spends time to properly annotate each one, by adding titles, captions, categories, copyright/photographer source, possibly adding GPS coordinates,...

Ultimately, YES, there IS help for 80-year old shots - but you have to use the descriptor "set" that is INTENDED to document picture CONTENT and not focus on the descriptor set that is intended to fingerprint FILE details.
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Jürgen Wolz
Jürgen Wolz
Moderator
Posts: 32


8/24/2022
Jürgen Wolz
Jürgen Wolz
Moderator
Posts: 32
StudioLine allows the creation of user descriptors for storing any image related info in it's database that is not covered by the standard descriptor fields in Exif or IPTC blocks. To do so, in the Descriptors tab, you can select "User descriptors" and "+" to create a new descriptor.
But, in general, for the purpose of exchanging information with other photographers through image meta data, it is recommended to use the standard (Exif- IPTC-) fields, e.g. IPTC Title, IPTC Caption and IPTC keywords.
If you want to pass your images on to others, I recommend using StudioLine Photo Classic, which allows updating image metadata of externally stored originals with information from the StudioLine database.

Best Regards
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Andy Schmidt
Andy Schmidt
Administrator
Posts: 113


8/24/2022
Andy Schmidt
Andy Schmidt
Administrator
Posts: 113
Ed wrote:
Is it possible to make new descriptors and propagate them by folder.


Yes, StudioLine has NO limit as far as creating your own USER DESCRIPTORS, with their own labels, and you can add whatever content (or automatically include/combine content from other user, system, EXIF or IPTC descriptors).

However, my strong recommendation would be to familiarize yourself with the IPTC descriptors and attempt to use those as much as possible. The reasons is, that the museum, publications, news editors, etc. are more likely to use photo archiving/management and "placement" tools that will LOOK for IPTC descriptors to automatically retrieve the title, captions, date, photographer, location, etc. of a picture.
They would not be able to retrieve that information from your own set of user descriptors.

User descriptors are useful for adding searchable fields that you use to manage your own photo archive inside of StudioLine that might be very specific to your type of application. Then, once you have used your descriptors to select a set of photos, I would "populate" the IPTC descriptors (e.g., by including content from your user descriptors) before "exporting" your photos for use by/sharing with third parties.

And also, YES, you can "propagate them by folder" using three different techniques:

a) You can set up folders for a certain theme (e.g., a certain event/day/location in history). Then you can "preset" descriptors for that folder (e.g., copyright, location, date, title,...) and when you add pictures to that folder, they will all be initialized with your preset folder descriptors.
Now you would just have to touch up individual photos where some of the details are different or should be elaborated on.

b) You can use the "add hoc" ability to copy/apply some or all descriptors from ONE picture in your folder to all others (or a large batch of selected photos) in that folder.

c) The third method is a bit of a mix of both: You create a "form" that combines any number of existing descriptors, you can fill in the descriptors with the information that you want to use for a whole group of pictures. Then, whenever you added pictures, you can choose to "apply" that form (and its content) to all those pictures.
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